Current States With Separate Exclusion Databases



I. Medicaid Exclusion

Exclusion Screening, LLC conducts monthly checks of our clients’ employees, contractors, and vendors against the OIG-LEIE, GSA-SAM, and all available State Exclusion Lists. Most providers understand that they have an obligation to check their employees, contractors, and vendors against the OIG-LEIE prior to hiring and monthly thereafter. Fewer providers are aware of their obligation to screen their individual state exclusion list, if their state maintains such a list.

CMS directed state Medicaid Directors to remind all providers that they have an obligation to search their state list whenever they search the LEIE.[1] In addition, many states require providers when they enroll or re-enroll in the Medicaid program to certify that no employee or contractor is excluded from participation in any state. This requirement echoes the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Section 6501, which states that if a provider is excluded in one state, he or she is excluded in all fifty states.[2]

II.  SAFERTM 

Exclusion Screening, LLC’s proprietary database, SAFER (State and Federal Exclusion Registry), imports the most recent exclusion data from each state list constantly. We are also in regular contact with state Medicaid and Program Integrity Offices about their lists.

III. State Exclusion Lists

The states that currently maintain a separate excluded provider list are the following ones below, click on a state to learn more about its screening requirements: 

AlabamaIdahoMichiganNorth Carolina
AlaskaIllinoisMinnesotaNorth Dakota
ArizonaIndianaMississippiOhio
ArkansasIowaMissouriPennsylvania
CaliforniaKansasMontanaSouth Carolina
ColoradoKentuckyNebraskaTennessee
ConnecticutLouisianaNevadaTexas
FloridaMaineNew HampshireWashington
GeorgiaMarylandNew JerseyWashington DC
HawaiiMassachusettsNew YorkWest VirginiaWyoming

IV.  Some States Require Screening Extraneous Lists

In addition to these states’ excluded provider lists, many states also require providers to check other various Medicaid Exclusion databases. In Ohio, for example, providers must search the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities Abuser Registry, the Ohio Auditor of State – Finding for Recovery Database, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities Abuser Registry, Social Security Administration’s Death Master File, The National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, in addition to the LEIE, SAM, and Ohio Exclusion List.[3] New Jersey providers must check the LEIE, New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs licensure databases, New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services licensure database, and the certified nurse aide and personal care assistant registry on a monthly basis.[4] 

For additional information visit “OIG Exclusion and State Exclusion Lists: Which Exclusion Lists Need to Be Screened? What Is the Difference Between Them?”
V.  A Simple and Affordable Solution

Without a doubt, state and federal exclusion screening requirements are incredibly burdensome for most providers. If screening your employees against each federal and state list that your state requires is not cost effective for your office to do in-house, contact Exclusion Screening, LLC today at 1-800-294-0952 or fill out our online service form found below. We would be happy to discuss your specific state obligations, provide a cost assessment, and help you create your employee and vendor list.



Medicaid oig Exclusion

Ashley Hudson, Associate Attorney at Liles Parker, LLP and former Chief Operating Officer for Exclusion Screening, LLC, is the author of this article.


[1] See Letter from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to State Medicaid Directors 5 (Jan. 16, 2009).

[2] See 42 U.S.C. § 1396a(a)(39) (2012), available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-111publ148/pdf/PLAW-111publ148.pdf (codifying the termination requirements of ACA § 6501); see also Letter from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), CPI-CMS Informational Bulletin, Affordable Care Act Program Integrity Provisions – Guidance to States — Section 6501 – Termination of Provider Participation under Medicaid if Terminated under Medicare or other State Plan (Jan. 20, 2012), available at http://downloads.cms.gov/cmsgov/archived-downloads/CMCSBulletins/downloads/6501-Term.pdf.

[3] See Ohio Admin. Code § 5160-1-17.8(c)(ii); Ohio Medicaid Provider Exclusion and Suspension List, Ohio Dep’t of Medicaid, http://medicaid.ohio.gov/PROVIDERS/EnrollmentandSupport/ProviderExclusionandSuspensionList.aspx (last accessed Jan. 22, 2015).

[4] Newsletter to All Providers, from the New Jersey Dep’t of Human Servs., et al., Excluded, Unlicensed or Uncertified Individuals or Entities (Oct. 2010).

OIG Exclusion and State Exclusion Lists: Which Exclusion Lists Need to Be Screened? What Is the Difference Between Them?

oig exclusion list

There are two federal databases that list persons and entities that have been excluded from participating in federal health care programs or receiving federal contracts. Checking and verifying individuals on the OIG Exclusion List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) and the GSA System for Award Management (SAM) should be part of any compliance exclusion screening program. The LEIE is maintained and updated by the Office of Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS-OIG), and the SAM consolidates several procurement based databases. 

Many states (over 40 as of today) also have their own individual databases which list individuals and entities that have been excluded from participating in their State Programs (such as Medicaid) or receiving any State contracts. We’ll briefly discuss the difference between these exclusion lists and explain why each should be screened. 

I.  OIG Exclusion List (LEIE)

oig exclusion list

The OIG exclusion list, LEIE, is maintained specifically for the purpose of listing all persons and entities that have been excluded from participating in the Medicare program. It is comprised of all persons currently excluded from the program by the OIG and is updated monthly. The list contains the name of the excluded individual or entity at the time of the exclusion, the provider type, the authority under which the individual was excluded, and the state where the excluded individual resided at the time of the exclusion. The LEIE can be accessed on the OIG’s website and up to five names can be searched at a time. It can also be downloaded for searching purposes. Matches can then be verified individually by Social Security Number.

It is important to remember that the LEIE is prepared and maintained by HHS for the specific purpose of identifying persons or entities that have been excluded from the Medicare Program by its Inspector General. Therefore, it will not contain persons or entities on other exclusion lists if, for instance, the information was never forwarded to it, or if the basis of that exclusion was insufficient to support one from the LEIE.[1]

II.  GSA-SAM

oig exclusion list

The SAM is an attempt by the federal government to consolidate several pre-existing procurement systems and combine them with the Catalog of Federal Domestic assistance. It is being done in phases. The first phase combined the functionality of the systems that listed persons or entities that were debarred, sanctioned, or excluded for contract or other fraud into a single searchable exclusion database. These were the Central Contractor Registry (CCR), Federal Agency Registration (FedReg), Online Representations and Certifications Application (ORCA), and the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS).

The SAM uses four exclusion classifications: Firm, Individual, Vessel, and Special Entity Designation. It also uses four exclusion types: Ineligible (Proceedings Pending), Ineligible (Proceedings Completed), Prohibition/Restriction, and Voluntary Exclusion.[2] There is significant overlap between the SAM and the LEIE. However, they were both created by several different agencies, and each has its own specific administrative process. It is not surprising that there are large gaps between them, and that they are ultimately very different in composition.

III.  State Medicaid Exclusion Lists


In addition to the HHS OIG Exclusion List of Excluded Individuals and Entities ( LEIE ) and the GSA SAM, several states (plus the District of Columbia) have their own Medicaid Exclusion Lists. These states are identified in red in the map to the left. In addition to being excluded from the specific states in which a person or entity is listed, Section 6501 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates that if a provider or entity is excluded under any state Medicaid database, then that provider or entity should be excluded from participating in all states.[3] State lists typically contain exclusions based upon licensing issues and many of these exclusions are not found on the LEIE, SAM or other state Lists. This occasionally occurs because the exclusion is based on a violation of a particular state statute. It also occurs because many states have inadequate processes to communicate exclusions to either the Federal Databases or their sister states.

Click below to learn more about the Exclusion Screening requirements in your State!
AlabamaIdahoMichiganNorth Carolina
AlaskaIllinoisMinnesotaNorth Dakota
ArizonaIndianaMississippiOhio
ArkansasIowaMissouriPennsylvania
CaliforniaKansasMontanaSouth Carolina
ColoradoKentuckyNebraskaTennessee
ConnecticutLouisianaNevadaTexas
FloridaMaineNew HampshireWashington
GeorgiaMarylandNew JerseyWashington DC
HawaiiMassachusettsNew YorkWest VirginiaWyoming
IV. Conclusion

The OIG exclusion list LEIE, (GSA) SAM, and State Medicaid databases were all created by different entities for different reasons. They have different exclusion criteria and though they address concerns that may be similar in nature, the information is often agency specific. Ultimately, the lists often contain different entities and persons. Considering these differences and the severity of the risk of employing excluded persons, we strongly recommend conducting monthly searches of all of these databases. Contact the exclusion experts at Exclusion Screening, LLCSM by calling 1-800-294-0952 or fill out our online service form below. 



 

 

Ashley Hudson

Ashley Hudson, Associate Attorney at Liles Parker, LLP and former Chief Operating Officer for Exclusion Screening, LLC, is the author of this article. 


[1] For more information see other discussions within our site on the effects of exclusion and the publication by the U.S. Dep’t of Health and Human Servs. Office of the Inspector Gen., Special Advisory Bulletin on the Effect of Exclusion from Participation in Federal Health Care Programs, 13 (May 8, 2013).

[2] When EPLS was consolidated into SAM in July 2012 Cause and Treatment (CT) codes were eliminated. For more information on the transformation see Changes from EPLS to SAM on the SAM website at https://www.sam.gov/sam/transcript/Quick_Guide_for_Changes_From_EPLS.pdf.

[3] 42 U.S.C. 1396(a) (2012). Whether an exclusion by one state actually “excludes” an individual from all states or makes him “excludable” from all states is an open question at present, but why take the chance of hiring a person who has been excluded in another State if you don’t have to?

Exclusion Loophole: Medicaid Managed Care

Medicaid Managed CareIn August, we discussed an OIG audit, which revealed that Medicaid providers who were terminated for cause were often able to still participate in other state Medicaid programs. Through this audit, OIG discovered that many providers were able to take advantage of a particular exclusion loophole within the Medicaid Managed Care program. Specifically, OIG discovered that 25 of the 41 states that participate in Medicaid Managed Care do not require providers to enroll in their state’s Medicaid program. The states instead permit providers to perform Medicaid managed care services based on contracts with managed care companies.

Identifying and Terminating

This loophole creates two unique problems for state Medicaid programs. First, it is much harder for a state to keep track of the providers participating in its Medicaid Managed Care program if the state does not require providers to actually enroll. In addition, if a state does not know exactly who is participating in its Medicaid Managed Care Program, then it is also difficult to search for providers to ensure that they were not terminated from participation in another state as required by ACA 6501. Second, it is very difficult for a state to terminate a provider from participating in its Medicaid program if it has no contractual relationship with that provider. In other words, it is very hard to end a relationship with someone if there was never a mutual agreement to actually begin the relationship.

Solution in Sight?

OIG recommended that CMS require state Medicaid programs to enroll Medicaid managed care providers. This would ensure that state Medicaid programs are actually able to identify and terminate providers who are terminated from participating in the federal health care programs by another state. CMS, not only heard this recommendation, but issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in June 2015 which will close the loophole if finalized. Even if this loophole is officially closed, Exclusion Screening, LLC will continue to recommend that providers screen all available federal and state lists to protect their practices. This is just one of the many ways terminated providers have gamed the system. 

Are you taking the necessary precautions to ensure you are not working with an excluded entity? We know it can be difficult to screen every Federal and State exclusion list. Call Exclusion Screening at 1-800-294-0952 or fill out the form below to hear about our cost-effective solution and for a free quote and assessment of your needs.



Ashley Hudson

Ashley Hudson, Associate Attorney at Liles Parker, LLP and former Chief Operating Officer for Exclusion Screening, LLC, is the author of this article.